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Trump could get sued for millions if he tweets

Former President Donald Trump had his Twitter account Reinstated but he can’t tweet or It Could Cost Him Millions.

Former President Donald Trump has yet to tweet since getting his Twitter account back after a nearly two-year-long exile, although he has continued to post several times Sunday on his Truth Social account.

Twitter owner and CEO Elon Musk Reinstated the Twitter account of former President Donald Trump on Saturday.

Musk ran a straw poll on the social media platform asking his followers to vote on whether to reinstate former U.S. President Donald Trump’s account on the platform. the poll YES vote won.

At its conclusion, Musk wrote in a tweet, “The people have spoken. Trump will be reinstated. Vox Populi, Vox Dei.” The latter phrase means “the voice of the people is the voice of god.” Trump’s account is now live on Twitter.

The ex-president was excommunicated from most major social media platforms in the wake of the Jan. 6, 2021 attack on the U.S. Capitol.

After getting banned from Twitter,  Trump launched his own platform, Truth Social, owned by Trump Media and Technology Group (TMTG).

After a bumpy launch, he’s been posting more frequently and preparing for TMTG to merge with a special purpose acquisition company (SPAC) called Digital World Acquisition Corp. in order to take the company public.

but a substantial part of the value of Truth Social is Trump’s own account and the ‘non-freedom of speech’ under Twitter’s old owners – this is why The vast majority of active users have been signing up.

Elon Musk may have killed off the business model of Trump’s Truth Social over the weekend by announcing Twitter’s policy is freedom of speech, but not freedom of reach.

As recently as Saturday, Trump was insisting that Truth Social was “doing phenomenally well,” with “much better” engagement than Twitter, that he would be “staying there,” and didn’t see “any reason” to go back to Twitter.

An SEC filing by the SPAC seeking to acquire TMTG spells out some of the legal entanglements that could make tweeting costly for Trump.

if Trump repeatedly signals in public before a merger that he’s never joining Twitter, then closes a SPAC deal and reneges, some shareholders could decide they were misled. said Eric Talley, a professor at Columbia Law School who specializes in corporate law.

“If it’s going to look, later on, that he never had that intention” of remaining off Twitter “but he just wanted to convince people that they should go ahead and close [the SPAC deal] that’s kind of a textbook securities fraud lawsuit,” Talley said.

The agreement governing the proposed merger does give Trump some leeway, but the waiting time is not an ideal one for Trump.

Trump “is generally obligated to make any social media post on TruthSocial and may not make the same post on another social media site for 6 hours. Thereafter, he is free to post on any site to which he has access.” He is also “may make a post from a personal account related to political messaging, political fundraising or get-out-the-vote efforts on any social media site at any time.” The agreement says.

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